Questions of Trust in Sales and Service

Most if not all who dip their toes into the fickle yet fruitful world of sales and service, know only too well that the questions we ask influence our success.

As I was returning from a six plus week European Holiday on the wonderful JAL flight from London via Tokyo (I know … right!), the idea of applying the classic Who, What, When, Where, How, and Why to the topic of Trust in Sales snuck into my thoughts.

Should you read on, you will find only questions – no answers (yet).

  • Who – In sales and service roles, who needs to be trusted? Who needs to trust whom? Who needs to be responsible for trust? Who needs to be accountable for trust?
  • What – In sales and service roles, what do ‘we’ mean when we use the terms trust, trusted, and trustworthy? What is the goal of earning, building, and maintaining trust in sales and service roles? What are the contributing elements of earning, building, and maintaining trust in sales and service roles? What are the costs of a lack of trust in sales and service roles? What are the benefits of earning, building, and maintaining trust in sales and service roles?
  • When – In sales and service roles, when is trust experienced, realised, felt, understood, appreciated … and when is it not?
  • Where – In sales and service roles, where is trust experienced?
  • How – In sales and service roles, how is trust monitored and measured? How is trust introduced? How is trust earned? How does trust in sales and service roles reflected through and/or different to individual and inter/infra team trust?
  • Why – In sales and service roles, why concern ourselves with understanding and nurturing trust?

In Sales and Service … Trust Matters!

Most if not all of us ‘get’ that trust is important, especially in sales and service roles.

However, if you lead a sales or service team (or indeed, if you are in a sales or service role), posing these questions about trust through the lens of Who, What, When, Where, How, and Why, can identify ‘trust-gaps’ that might be negatively impacting your success.

And if you think I’ve left some obvious questions about trust out of the above, let me know.

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